Join us Sunday for Backyard Birding!

Backyard Birding Photographers 011418
Backyard Birding Photographers.

REGISTER NOW!

Date: Sunday December 16, 8am-10am
Activity: Backyard Birding
Location:Creek Watch Trace, Seabrook Island
Max: 12-15
Cost: free for SIB Members, $5 fee for guests.

 

This is a reschedule of the rain delayed Backyard Birding originally scheduled for December 9.

Join SIB members near the home of Melanie and Robert Jerome at the boat dock on Creek Watch Trace on Seabrook Island on Sunday, December 16, 2018, 8:00 – 10:00 am. You will have great views of the marsh and river. The Jerome’s have hosted the group in September and again in November when an average of 23 species was seen each time. There is a lot to see at the SIPOA boat ramp and crab dock. Not only are there many shore birds, but the Clapper Rails are active at low tide. Melanie Jerome lives at Creek Watch Villas and sees them every morning. Many shorebirds and songbirds. In the marsh by the fire station, additional birds may be seen. There will be seats available to sit and bird or a group can go walking.

Bring a snack if you like along with binoculars and bug spray.

Once you are a member, please REGISTER no later than Friday December 14, 2018. All registrants will receive a confirmation letter the day prior the event.

If you have additional questions about the program, please contact us by sending an email to: SeabrookIslandBirders@gmail.com

If you are not yet a 2018 SIB member, you must first become a member by following the instructions on our website or we request a $5 donation to SIB.

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“My Patch”

My favorite birding magazine is BirdWatching which is published six times a year by Madavor Media, LLC.  One of the common contributors is Pete Dunne, an author who is described as “New Jersey Audubon’s ambassador at large.”  In the September/October issue, he has a piece entitled “My Patch.”  It is about a nearby spot where he can bird, when time is short, with some certainty of success.  I think Seabrook Island, as a SIBer’s ‘patch’, rather fits his definition.  Thus, I would like to share bits and pieces of this article from BirdWatching’s Vol. 32, Issue 5.

Pete describes his “new favorite spot” as being “a 13-minute drive from my door.”  “Why this particular location …..?  In a word, birds …. the volume of birds and the delicious proximity.”   “And yes, I love to spend the day birding Cape May, but that takes planning …… when I count up the minutes and the benefits, I find that I invest most of my birding time in my local patch.

“I’ll bet you have one too, and I hope, like mine, your patch is protected. Be a shame to wake up one morning and find a sign on your site ….. . All local natural areas are priceless, offering variable habitat for local wildlife and a focus for birders when good fortune knocks.  Make sure your local land planners appreciate the importance to this local Eden of yours.  You are your local patch’s greatest champion.  Be a vocal one.  And before interests compete, document, document, document.  Prove the importance of that local woodlot with breeding survey data, migration counts, and winter bird surveys.  Or team up ….. and organize an annual Earth Day bird outing for residents and local politicians.  Show them the special nature of your patch.”

Thanks, Pete.  Seabrook is our local patch! Substitute any of ‘North Beach’ or ‘Equestrian Center’ or ‘Garden/maintenance Area’ or ‘Jenkins Point’ for the woodlot mentioned in Pete’s paragraph.  Our Eden is at hand and its future is in our hands.

Submitted by:  George Haskins

Member sees rare Great Black Hawk in Maine

My name is Karen O’Brien and I am a member of Seabrook Island Birders.  I share my time between Seabrook and my home in Portland, Maine.  On December 3, I had the opportunity to see a rare Great Black Hawk.  I thought my friends on Seabrook may like to share my experience.  That Monday, I spent a very very special three hours in a large park in the middle of the city of Portland, ME watching, with at least 200 of our closest friends, a Great Black Hawk devouring as many squirrels as he could. He has never been sighted in the U.S. , so I’m told, living between Mexico and Argentina . I spoke with many people who had flown in from the Midwest and other parts of the country!!!    It was a thrill and privilege to look up and revel in the grace and beauty and sheer fortitude of this amazing vagrant.
An article in the Boston Globe provides more information.
The bird remains in the area so maybe some of you want to take a field trip to cold Maine for this rare experience.   It IS very cold and icy here with about 8 inches of snow
Submitted by: Karen O’Brien
Photo by: Andres Picon of the Boston Globe

Preventing Bird Collision with Glass Windows

We have so much natural beauty on Seabrook Island and, naturally, we want large unobstructed windows in our homes so that we are able to enjoy that beauty and our wildlife at all times. Unfortunately, these windows are a constant danger to the birds that we love seeing and have lured to our yards with feeders. So often our neighbors post on our social media sites about being heartsick when a bird dies after colliding into a window, and we all understand how sad that is to witness. 

A Black-and-white Warbler sits quietly and recovers after hitting a window. Photo by Laura Erickson via Birdshare

There are many suggestions on how to prevent birds from flying into your windows. Understandably, many of us do not want to give up our views by installing heavy draperies or applying sticky notes every two inches. If you are serious about finding alternatives, there are some less obtrusive solutions. Check out the link below for some ideas and also read the comments from other bird enthusiasts. Some people have had success by simply moving the location of their feeder or not cleaning their windows. Now, that’s a win-win! 

We really do have so many birds right outside our windows. Let’s do our part to keep them safe and abundant.

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/why-birds-hit-windows-and-how-you-can-help-prevent-it/

Submitted by: Joleen Ardaiolo

Photo by Laura Erickson via Birdshare

Join us Sunday for Backyard Birding!

Backyard Birding Photographers 011418
Backyard Birding Photographers.

REGISTER NOW!

Date: Sunday December 9, 8am-10am
Activity: Backyard Birding
Location:Creek Watch Trace, Seabrook Island
Max: 12-15
Cost: free for SIB Members, $5 fee for guests.

 

Join SIB members near the home of Melanie and Robert Jerome at the boat dock on Creek Watch Trace on Seabrook Island on Sunday, December 9, 2018, 8:00 – 10:00 am. You will have great views of the marsh and river. The Jerome’s have hosted the group in September and again in November when an average of 23 species was seen each time. There is a lot to see at the SIPOA boat ramp and crab dock. Not only are there many shore birds, but the Clapper Rails are active at low tide. Melanie Jerome lives at Creek Watch Villas and sees them every morning. Many shorebirds and songbirds. In the marsh by the fire station, additional birds may be seen. There will be seats available to sit and bird or a group can go walking.

Bring a snack if you like along with binoculars and bug spray.

Once you are a member, please REGISTER no later than Friday December 7, 2018. All registrants will receive a confirmation letter the day prior the event.

If you have additional questions about the program, please contact us by sending an email to: SeabrookIslandBirders@gmail.com

If you are not yet a 2018 SIB member, you must first become a member by following the instructions on our website or we request a $5 donation to SIB.

Recent Sightings – Red-breasted Nuthatch!

This past weekend the weather was certainly not conducive to outdoor activities. At least it wasn’t cold, so I spent most of my day on my screened porch reading and keeping an eye on my bird feeders. There were naturally lots of Chickadees and Tufted Titmouse and occasionally Northern Cardinals, a Goldfinch, and a Red-bellied or Downy Woodpecker.

Rainy days do have their advantages though. Had I not been confined to this one corner at my home, I would not have seen the Red-breasted Nuthatch at my suet feeder. I saw a female several times on Sunday and a male on Monday. The female has the same prominent white eyebrows as the male, but her chest is pale unlike the rust color of the male.

Apparently, mine was not the only sighting this weekend, so put out your suet feeders and take advantage of these rainy days.

Male Red-breasted Nuthatch
Photo by Jim Reimer

-Submitted by Joleen Ardaiolo

Enjoy a Morning Bird Walk with SIB this Thursday

REGISTER NOW!

BIRD WALK 2-18-18 (5 of 7)
Birders at Maintenance Area – Charley Moore

Date: Thursday December 6, 2016 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Activity: Learning Together at the Water Treatment Plant, Maintenance & Equestrian Center
Location: Park at the Gardens near the Recycling area
Max: 15
Cost: None for members; $5 donation for guests

By now the wintering birds have found their way back to Seabrook Island. We will tour around the ponds at the Water Treatment area, the gardens and the horse pastures in search of wintering waterfowl, birds of prey and passerines. Bring sun block, bug spray, a hat, water and binoculars.

Please register no later than Tuesday December 4 , 2018. All registrants will receive a confirmation letter the day prior the event.

If you are not yet a 2018 SIB member, you must first become a member by following the instructions on our website: https://seabrookislandbirders.org/contact/join-sib/.