Seabrook Island Shorebird Steward Program

Seabrook Island Shorebird Stewards Return to the Beach!

Daily, starting on March 1, 2022, Seabrook Island beachgoers may see Shorebird Stewards like Seabrook Island resident Tim Finan on North Beach. Shorebird Stewards educate people about the various shorebirds that use the Seabrook Island Beaches. All shorebird species are in decline and need help. Shorebird Stewards explain why shorebirds use the Seabrook Island beach and why beachgoers should “Share the Beach- Give Them Space”.

The Seabrook Island Shorebird Steward program is looking for more volunteers. Starting in March until July, stewards spend 2 hour shifts on the beach. The schedule is flexible and a scheduling website makes it easy to find times to fit anyone’s schedule.

Stewards don’t have to be a skilled birder. During the training program, participants learn shorebird identification, how to use our optics, and how to be a good steward. The training consists of a 2-hour classroom session plus on-beach field training.

People interested in becoming a Shorebird Steward can register here (sib.wildlifepreservationservices.com). To prevent bots from invading the site, registration requires several steps. All new Stewards should attend an SCAudubon led training on February 19, 2022, starting at 9:00 AM in the Oystercatcher Community Room or watch a recording of the presentation. All Stewards new or returning, need to participate in one of the many scheduled field training dates (details to be provided to those who register). For more information or to join us for a North Beach bird walk, please contact: sibstewards@gmail.com.

Free Virtual Evening Event featuring SC-DNR Felicia Sanders

The public is invited to enjoy a zoom presentation by Felicia Sanders on “Hemispheric Flights of Migratory Shorebirds” on February 16, 2022, at 7pm. Felicia has been active in shorebird conservation and research for over thirty years. Her talk draws on her many years of banding and tracking shorebirds including her 5 trips to the Arctic. She will also focus on the technology that allows scientists to track the migrations of many shorebirds that stop to rest or refuel on Seabrook: Red Knots, Whimbrel, Dunlin and others. 

SIB Members Elect 2022 Officers

As a result of the postponement of the January meeting of 2022, Seabrook Island Birders (SIB) asked our members to vote electronically. The slate of officers nominated by the Executive Committee to lead SIB in 2022 and approved by our members are:

Officers:
—Past Chair – Judy Morr
—Chair – Joleen Ardaiolo
—Vice Chair – Walter Brooks
—Membership/Treasurer –Nancy Brown
—Secretary – Beverly Stribling

In addition to the officers, the SIB Executive Committee is made of of the following committee leads:

Standing Committees:
-Activities – Bob Mercer
-Bluebird Trails Chair – Melanie Jerome
-Communications – Judy Morr/Beverly Stribling/Jackie Brooks
-Hospitality – Lesley Gore
-Program Chair – Ed Konrad
-Shorebird Steward – Bob Mercer
-Web Master – Nancy Brown

Directors-At-Large:
– Tim Barnard
– Mary Wilde

If you are interested to join a committee, please fill out our Volunteer Form. To contact any officer, please send an email to: seabrookislandbirders@gmail.com.

2022 Seabrook Island Birders – Executive Committee:
Top Row: Lesley Gore, Nancy Brown, Judy Morr
Middle Row: Melanie Jerome, Mary Wilde, Joleen Ardaiolo
Bottom Row: Bob Mercer, Ed Konrad, Walter Brooks
Missing: Beverly Stribling, Tim Finan

Register for SIB’s February Virtual Evening Program

Hemispheric Flights of Migratory Shorebirds

Everyone is Welcome!

Date: Wednesday, February 16, 2022
Program starts 7:00pm.
Location: Zoom Virtual Video
Fee: Free
Attendance: 500

Questions? Email us at: SeabrookIslandBirders@gmail.com

Each year millions of shorebirds migrate to Arctic breeding grounds from wintering sites in South & Central America and southern North America. SC beaches are important sites for these long-distance migratory birds. Many know the Red Knot’s journey – Arctic tundra to nest, southern South America for winter, AND a stop in SC to refuel. But what about Whimbrels, Dunlin, Sanderlings, and Semipalmated Plovers that also nest on the northern Arctic shores?

What are migration routes of Seabrook’s shorebirds? Where do the birds spend the rest of the year? How do banding, innovative tagging & tracking technology, and peoples’ reporting help identify birds’ exact movements and locations? Join us for Felicia Sanders’, SCDNR partner and SIB’s good friend, fascinating look at the diverse countries & habitats shorebirds encounter on their global journeys!

Felicia Sanders has been working 30 years on conservation efforts for a wide diversity of bird species. Felicia joined the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources in 2001, and leads South Carolina’s Seabird and Shorebird Projects. Her primary tasks are promoting conservation of important sites for nesting and migrating coastal birds, surveying seabirds and shorebirds, and partnering with universities to research life histories. She is a coauthor on numerous scientific publications, and has traveled to the Arctic 5 times to participate in shorebird research projects. Felicia went to graduate school at Clemson University, majoring in biology. Last year she was awarded the Biologist of the Year by the Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, whose members include 15 states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

REMINDER – Don’t Miss Ed & Aija’s “Top 10 Birding Moments Around the World!” – SIB’s Virtual Evening Program on November 17th

Join longtime SIB members, the Konrad’s, for a birding travelogue! Aija (the birder) and Ed (the photographer) will share their most memorable moments from the past 10 years of birding around the world. From their archives of over 1000 world life birds, they’ll take us through a photographic journey of interesting species, challenging hunts, beautiful countries and vistas, and some fun stories along the way.

Date: Wednesday November 17, 2021
Time: 7:00 – 8:15 PM
Location: Zoom Virtual Video
Fee: FREE

REGISTER TODAY

Meet the Speakers:

Aija and Ed Konrad, Seabrook Island Birders

Aija and Ed have been birding at Seabrook for 12 years. Aija is the avid birdwatcher, and Ed is the photographer. You may have seen them at North Beach or around Palmetto Lake, the tall blonde with binoculars and the guy with the big lens camera. They’ve been SIB members and advocates for protecting our shorebirds for many years, and Ed serves on the board. We enjoy Aija’s birding articles and view Ed’s photos each month on the Seabrooker SIB page, along with their many articles on SIB’s website.

In the last decade they’ve traveled extensively to bird and shoot photos in 49 US states and Canada, Central and South America, Europe, and the Far East. In 2018, Aija did a US Big Year, and they crisscrossed the country to see how many bird species they could identify in a calendar year. They recorded 577 species, and Aija placed #15 on eBird’s Lower 48 states! In 2019 they spent a month following and birding the Lewis and Clark Trail to the Pacific.

Aija and Ed are Penn State graduates. They live in Atlanta full time and Seabrook Island about 7 days a month. They have 2 children and 4 grandchildren.

“Top 10 Birding Moments Around the World!” – Register for SIB’s Virtual Evening Program on November 17th

Virtual Evening Program November 17, 2021
Top 10 Birding Moments Around the World!”

Join longtime SIB members, the Konrad’s, for a birding travelogue! Aija (the birder) and Ed (the photographer) will share their most memorable moments from the past 10 years of birding around the world. From their archives of over 1000 world life birds, they’ll take us through a photographic journey of interesting species, challenging hunts, beautiful countries and vistas, and some fun stories along the way.

Date: Wednesday November 17, 2021
Time: 7:00 – 8:15 PM
Location: Zoom Virtual Video
Fee: FREE

REGISTER TODAY

Meet the Speakers:

Aija and Ed Konrad, Seabrook Island Birders

Aija and Ed have been birding at Seabrook for 12 years. Aija is the avid birdwatcher, and Ed is the photographer. You may have seen them at North Beach or around Palmetto Lake, the tall blonde with binoculars and the guy with the big lens camera. They’ve been SIB members and advocates for protecting our shorebirds for many years, and Ed serves on the board. We enjoy Aija’s birding articles and view Ed’s photos each month on the Seabrooker SIB page, along with their many articles on SIB’s website.

In the last decade they’ve traveled extensively to bird and shoot photos in 49 US states and Canada, Central and South America, Europe, and the Far East. In 2018, Aija did a US Big Year, and they crisscrossed the country to see how many bird species they could identify in a calendar year. They recorded 577 species, and Aija placed #15 on eBird’s Lower 48 states! In 2019 they spent a month following and birding the Lewis and Clark Trail to the Pacific.

Aija and Ed are Penn State graduates. They live in Atlanta full time and Seabrook Island about 7 days a month. They have 2 children and 4 grandchildren.

Memorial Service for Bob Hider (1937 – 2021)

Memorial Service for Bob Hider, husband of Marcia Hider.
  Anyone who knew him is welcome!
  Friday June 25th at 11:00 in Atlantic Room at the Club

Bob was an Avid Armchair Birder and supported Marcia when she started SIB with Charley. Even before there was a Seabrook Island Birders, Bob helped with Christmas Bird Count. He also was an avid photographer who has contributed a number of bird photos to our articles and blogs. Although he didn’t participate in many bird walks, he was always willing to share the views and identifications from his back deck, overlooking the marsh. He will be missed by all.

You can read a copy of his obituary published in the The Post and Courier back in March, 2021.

Enormous flock of Whimbrel discovered on Deveaux Bank

Last night an announcement concerning Deveaux Bank was so special it was made at a special event held at the Charleston Museum to an audience filled with some of the state’s most notable naturalists. After years of monitoring and documentation, our backyard barrier island was found to be a stopover for tens of thousands of Whimbrels.

The largest-known flock of whimbrels was discovered roosting in coastal South Carolina. Andy Johnson/Cornell Lab of Ornithology/Provided

Read Post and Courier’s article about the announcement. The news release from SCDNR has even more information.

One question from the audience last night was “Where do the Whimbrel’s go during the day?” The answer was to neighboring beaches and marshes to hunt and eat. Seabrook Island Birders can attest to that. During the April 21 International Shorebird Survey on North Beach, Bob Mercer recorded 34 Whimbrel. That was considered a great number. Then on May 8, Aija Konrad reported 157 Whimbrel in the mudflats at the curve at Jenkins Point. During the May 31 International Shorebird Survey on North Beach, Mark Andrews reported 1 on the lagoon on North Beach. Most of the Whimbrels have now moved on to their breeding grounds in the Arctic.

YOU’RE INVITED: On Tuesday, June 22 at 6 p.m., join the team who made the discovery at Deveaux for a free virtual screening and panel discussion. Click here to learn more and register: http://bit.ly/WhimbrelDiscovery. As you watch the video, keep in mind the challenges the photographers, DNR personnel and ornithologists had to endure to capture the video and data.

You can learn more about Whimbrels here.

Deveaux Bank Seabird Sanctuary is closed year-round above the high-water line, apart from areas designated by signs for limited recreational use (beaches on the ends of the island, facing inland). From March 15 through October 15, some of the island’s beaches are closed for seasonal nesting of coastal birds and are demarcated by fencing. Dogs and camping are prohibited year-round. If you see violators to these rules, contact SCDNR at 1-800-922-5431.

Bob Hider (1937 – 2021)

Seabrook Island Birders is sad to share the news of the death of early member Bob Hider. Even before there was a Seabrook Island Birders, Bob helped with Christmas Bird Count. He also was an avid photographer who has contributed a number of bird photos to our articles and blogs. Although he didn’t participate in many bird walks, he was always willing to share the views and identifications from his back deck, overlooking the marsh. He will be missed by all.

You can read a copy of his obituary from The Post and Courier.

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