Watch: “Busy Beaches After Red Knots:  Supporting Our Nesting Shorebirds”

Abby Sterling, PhD

The Kiawah Island Shorebird Stewardship Program, lead by Bette Popillo, is hosting an upcoming Zoom presentation on Tuesday May 10th at 5:30 pm and would like to invite all Seabrook Island Birder (SIB) members to watch a fabulous presenter, Abby Sterling.  For those of you who don’t know who Abby Sterling is, she is a shorebird biologist and is the director of the Georgia Bight Shorebird Conservation Initiative.

The title of Abby Sterling’s talk is: “Busy Beaches After Red Knots:  Supporting Our Nesting Shorebirds”

A brief description of her talk:  

As the last of our Red Knots and other Arctic nesting shorebirds depart at the end of May, the beaches can feel a bit empty.  But, tucked above the wrack line and in the dunes, drama continues to unfold.  Nesting Wilson’s Plovers and American Oystercatchers are overcoming a host of challenges to successfully incubate eggs and raise chicks.  These species are both of high conservation concern, and our actions can have a significant impact on their ability to raise their offspring.  Learn more about the secret lives of the beach nesting shorebirds that depend on our backyards, and simple steps that we can take to help them succeed.

When: May 10, 2022 05:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Where: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86249136507

Or One tap mobile : 

    US: +13017158592,,86249136507#  or +13126266799,,86249136507#

Or Telephone:

    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):

        US: +1 301 715 8592  or +1 312 626 6799  or +1 929 205 6099  or +1 253 215 8782  or +1 346 248 7799  or +1 669 900 6833

Webinar ID: 862 4913 6507

***The presentation will also be recorded.***

Author: sibirders

SEABROOK ISLAND BIRDERS / “watching, learning, protecting” Seabrook Island Birders (SIB) are residents, renters and guests of Seabrook Island, SC who have an interest in learning, protecting and providing for the well-being of the incredible variety of birds that inhabit Seabrook Island throughout the year.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: