Seabrook Island Birders participated in Great Backyard Bird Count

As mentioned in an earlier blog, Seabrook Island Birders scheduled five “walks” to participate in the Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC).  And the group truly did participate!  Over the course of two days, 53 individuals participated in at least one of the walks.  80 different species were identified over the two days on Seabrook Island.  The great weather, great friends and great birding on these two days has many of us looking forward to our Learning Together on March 1 in the fields behind Freshfields.   We also have a Backyard Birding on March 14 on Deer Point.  Of course all scheduled activities can be seen the Activity Page of the Seabrook Island Birders web site (seabrookislandbirders.org).

Birders at Maintenance Area – Charley Moore

The GBBC walks started at 8:00 AM Sunday with 8 people looking for ducks and other birds at the SIPOA Maintenance area and then on to the Equestrian Center.  35 species were identified at the Maintenance area including the ponds at the Waste Management area.

Yellow-rumped Warbler – Charley Moore

Yellow-rumped Warblers were greeting us everywhere but the Bufflehead and Hooded Mergansers and Ruddy Duck also were there for us.  A Downy Woodpecker also presented itself.  As we went on to the Equestrian Center, 14 species were identified there.

 

Eastern Bluebird – Dean Morr

European Starlings and a Black Vulture were the only species added to the day’s list but the Eastern Bluebirds were abundant along with the expected European Starlings, American Robins and Killdeer.

The second walk of the day took us to North Beach were we expected to see a vastly different species of birds.  In the 41 species seen on North Beach, 28 were new for the day.  Red-breasted Mergansers, Forster’s Terns and Sanderlings may have been the most frequent bird sees, it was the Northern Gannets diving out at sea and the ability to idenitify a Great Black-backed Gull were probably the highlights of the walk.

Preparing for Children’s Bird Walk – Dean Morr

The third walk was so much fun, an entire blog will be devoted to describe the walk around Palmetto Lake where the children of Seabrook joined us to learn more about birding.  The group was large enough we split in to two groups and went in opposite directions around the lake.  Each group identified 24 species but combined, 27 species were seen.  A highlight, besides seeing the enthusiastic children, was as the two groups met at the back side of the lake, an Osprey flew in and landed on a branch above our head.  All were able to observe it through the spotting scope and see it still held a fish in its right talon.

Great Egret in Breeding Plumage – Dean Morr

Sunday’s activities were completed with a drive/walk along Jenkins Point where the Great Egrets were beginning to show their breeding plumage.  An amazing 11 Black-crowned Night Heron were also seen with the difference between a mature and immature easily able to be seen.  The most “unusual” sighting of this final activity was using the spotting scope from Nancy Island, Rock Pigeons could be seen over at Rockville.  A total of 24 species were seen on this segment with the Rock Pigeons, a Wild Turkey and a Fish Crow being “firsts” for the day.

Monday’s participation in GBBC took place on Ocean Winds Golf Course.  23 people split into 3 groups to traverse the golf course in different directions using golf carts.  46 species were identified between the 3 groups with the group that started on the back nine seeing 37 species.  That group was able to see a Northern Gannet from the 14th tee, next to the ocean.  From that location, they saw several other shore birds not normally considered “golf course” birds.  Only group saw the Wild Turkey and as the group going forward on the front nine met the group going backwards on the front nine, an Anhinga, Great Egrets in breeding plumage and a Cooper’s Hawk were seen.  Most of the group only had time to cover 9 holes of the course but a few from the front nine were able to continue on to the back where they also saw the Common Gallinule, the Bald Eagle perched on the tree near the practice facilities, and an Osprey checking out the nesting platform near the Oystercatcher bridge.  Earlier, the Bald Eagle was seen perched above the nest on Crooked Oaks 3rd hole although no reports of chicks have been reported.

Overall, it was a great weekend to contribute to citizen science.  Detail lists of the sightings are shown below.

Seabrook Island — SIPOA/Club Maintenance Area – 33 species

Bufflehead 16
Hooded Merganser 3
Ruddy Duck 1
Wood Stork 1
Double-crested Cormorant 1
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Killdeer 4
Spotted Sandpiper 1
Ring-billed Gull 6
Mourning Dove 3
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
Downy Woodpecker 2
Northern Flicker 2
Eastern Phoebe 1
Blue Jay 8
American Crow 3
Carolina Chickadee 5
Tufted Titmouse 7
House Wren 2
Carolina Wren 7
Eastern Bluebird 7
American Robin 6
Gray Catbird 3
Brown Thrasher 2
Cedar Waxwing 9
Palm Warbler 3
Pine Warbler 2
Yellow-rumped Warbler 15
White-throated Sparrow 5
Song Sparrow 1
Northern Cardinal 6
Boat-tailed Grackle 13

Seabrook Island-Equestrian Center – 14 species

Black Vulture 1
Killdeer 15
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 2
Downy Woodpecker 2
Blue Jay 5
American Crow 2
Carolina Chickadee 3
Carolina Wren 3
Eastern Bluebird 18
American Robin 12
European Starling 8
Palm Warbler 6
Chipping Sparrow 5
Red-winged Blackbird 2

Seabrook Island–North Beach – 41 species (+1 other taxa)

Bufflehead 35
Red-breasted Merganser 52
Red-throated Loon 1
Northern Gannet 4
Double-crested Cormorant 65
Brown Pelican 19
Great Blue Heron 1
Great Egret 2
Osprey 1
Bald Eagle 2
American Oystercatcher 8
Black-bellied Plover 5
Ruddy Turnstone 3
Sanderling 50
Dunlin 120
Western Sandpiper 1
Greater Yellowlegs 1
Willet 18
Bonaparte’s Gull 5
Laughing Gull 83
Ring-billed Gull 10
Herring Gull 9
Great Black-backed Gull 3
Forster’s Tern 220
Royal Tern 4
Belted Kingfisher 1
Downy Woodpecker 1
Blue Jay 3
American Crow 6
crow sp. 3
Tree Swallow 400
Carolina Chickadee 4
Tufted Titmouse 2
Carolina Wren 1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 2
Eastern Bluebird 2
Northern Mockingbird 1
Pine Warbler 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler 13
White-throated Sparrow 1
Eastern Towhee 2
Northern Cardinal 3

Seabrook Island — Palmetto Lake – 24 species

Double-crested Cormorant 2
Great Blue Heron 1
Great Egret 3
Snowy Egret 1
Black-crowned Night-Heron 2
Black Vulture 10
Turkey Vulture 1
Osprey 1
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
Eastern Phoebe 1
Blue Jay 2
Tufted Titmouse 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Eastern Bluebird 6
American Robin 75
Northern Mockingbird 1
Cedar Waxwing 8
Palm Warbler 2
Yellow-rumped Warbler 13
Chipping Sparrow 4
White-throated Sparrow 1
Song Sparrow 1
Northern Cardinal 2

Seabrook Island — Palmetto Lake – 24 species

Double-crested Cormorant 2
Great Blue Heron 1
Great Egret 5
Snowy Egret 1
Black-crowned Night-Heron 2
Black Vulture 2
Turkey Vulture 3
Osprey 1
Ring-billed Gull 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
Eastern Phoebe 1
Blue Jay 4
American Crow 2
Carolina Wren 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3
Eastern Bluebird 10
American Robin 65
Northern Mockingbird 1
Palm Warbler 8
Yellow-rumped Warbler 35
Chipping Sparrow 6
White-throated Sparrow 2
Song Sparrow 1
Northern Cardinal 3

Seabrook Island — Jenkins Point Rd – 24 species

Hooded Merganser 35
Wild Turkey 1
Wood Stork 1
Double-crested Cormorant 6
Brown Pelican 1
Great Egret 14
Snowy Egret 5
Tricolored Heron 6
Black-crowned Night-Heron 11
Turkey Vulture 4
Bald Eagle 2
Laughing Gull 1
Ring-billed Gull 1
Forster’s Tern 2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 6
Belted Kingfisher 1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 2
American Crow 3
Fish Crow 1
Tufted Titmouse 2
Yellow-rumped Warbler 4
Northern Cardinal 1
Red-winged Blackbird 3
Boat-tailed Grackle 2

Seabrook Island — Ocean Winds Golf Course – Front Nine – 31 species
15 Hooded Merganser
5 Double-crested Cormorant
2 Anhinga
1 Brown Pelican
2 Great Blue Heron
7 Great Egret
1 Little Blue Heron
1 Black Vulture
1 Cooper’s Hawk
2 Bald Eagle
1 Red-shouldered Hawk
1 Mourning Dove
2 Belted Kingfisher
9 Red-bellied Woodpecker
2 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
7 Northern Flicker
1 Eastern Phoebe
4 Blue Jay
5 American Crow
2 Fish Crow
4 Carolina Chickadee
6 Tufted Titmouse
2 Carolina Wren
2 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
11 Eastern Bluebird
6 Pine Warbler
8 Yellow-rumped Warbler
4 Northern Cardinal
1 Brown-headed Cowbird
20 Boat-tailed Grackle

Seabrook Island — Ocean Winds Golf Course – Front Nine – 24 species

Hooded Merganser 23
Wild Turkey 1
Double-crested Cormorant 6
Anhinga 1
Brown Pelican 1
Great Blue Heron 2
Great Egret 5
Little Blue Heron 1
Cooper’s Hawk 1
Bald Eagle 1
Mourning Dove 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 3
Downy Woodpecker 2
American Crow 5
Fish Crow 2
Carolina Chickadee 3
Tufted Titmouse 2
Carolina Wren 1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Eastern Bluebird 6
American Robin 2
Yellow-rumped Warbler 2
Northern Cardinal 3
Red-winged Blackbird 1

Seabrook Island — Ocean Winds Golf Course – Back Nine – 37 species

Hooded Merganser 5
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Wood Stork 2
Northern Gannet 3
Double-crested Cormorant 18
Brown Pelican 3
Great Blue Heron 1
Great Egret 4
Snowy Egret 1
Tricolored Heron 1
Green Heron 1
Black-crowned Night-Heron 3
Osprey 2
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Common Gallinule 1
Forster’s Tern 1
Royal Tern 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 3
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
Downy Woodpecker 2
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Blue Jay 5
American Crow 6
Fish Crow 13
Carolina Chickadee 11
Tufted Titmouse 7
Carolina Wren 5
Eastern Bluebird 11
Gray Catbird 2
Brown Thrasher 1
Northern Mockingbird 3
Pine Warbler 2
Yellow-rumped Warbler 17
Northern Cardinal 11
Red-winged Blackbird 18
Boat-tailed Grackle 8
House Finch 3

Seabrook Island — Ocean Winds Golf Course – Back Nine – 24 species

Hooded Merganser 6
Double-crested Cormorant 19
Brown Pelican 1
Great Blue Heron 2
Great Egret 1
Tricolored Heron 1
Osprey 1
Bald Eagle 1
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Common Gallinule 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
Eastern Phoebe 1
Blue Jay 1
American Crow 7
Carolina Chickadee 2
Tufted Titmouse 2
Carolina Wren 1
Eastern Bluebird 8
American Robin 25
Northern Mockingbird 3
Yellow-rumped Warbler 2
Northern Cardinal 2
Red-winged Blackbird 4
House Finch 1

Submitted by: Judy Morr

Photos by: Charlie Moore and Dean Morr

Advertisements

Author: sibirders

SEABROOK ISLAND BIRDERS / “watching, learning, protecting” Seabrook Island Birders (SIB) are residents, renters and guests of Seabrook Island, SC who have an interest in learning, protecting and providing for the well-being of the incredible variety of birds that inhabit Seabrook Island throughout the year.

2 thoughts on “Seabrook Island Birders participated in Great Backyard Bird Count”

  1. I took some photos of a roseate spoonbill on Jenkins point yesterday. Would the SIB group be interested in copies?

    Lawrence Kiroff

    >

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s