Bird Sightings on Seabrook Island – Week Ending March 27, 2016

SIB will publish this regular blog post to report interesting or unusual bird sightings on Seabrook Island.

Name:  Nancy Brown & Flo Foley
Date & Time of Sighting:  3/26/16 8:30am
Name of Bird Species:  Wood Stork
Number of Birds Sighted: 1
Location of Sighting:  Observed a single Wood Stork flying over the Lake House


Additional Sightings (see pictures below)

SIB held its second “Learning Together” bird walk Thursday March 24th on North Beach led by three SIB committee members (Marcia Hider, Flo Foley & Nancy Brown).  Twenty SIB members, many new to birding, participated on the beautiful morning and birded from the parking lot, along the boardwalk and on the beach.
As we left the parking lot, we could hear the high-pitched, trilled bzeee of a flock of Cedar Waxwings perched in a tree.  After a loud construction sound, the flock lifted into the air and we saw two other large flocks in the distance take off with a total of more than 50 birds!
On the beach, we saw several large clusters of shorebirds.  Using the scopes, we observed a Greater Yellowlegs dancing in a small pond of water as it fed on small minnows.  And further down the beach we watched three American Oystercatchers fly in and hang at the shoreline. The team thought they had a large flock of Red Knots on the beach, but after further investigation determined it was a mixed flock of Dunlins, Sanderlings and Plovers.  Thanks to Judy Morr for helping to identify various birds.
In total the group saw more than 20 species, including:
Brown Pelican
Osprey
American Oystercatcher
Semipalmated Plover
Greater Yellowlegs
Sanderling
Dunlin
Western Sandpiper
Black Scoters
Laughing Gull
Downy Woodpecker
American Crow
Fish Crow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Carolina Wren
Northern Mockingbird
Cedar Waxwing
Pine Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Savannah Sparrow
Northern Cardinal
Please enjoy these photos taken by Dean Morr!
(click on a photo to view as a slide show)
Advertisements

SIB “Bird of the Week” – Red Knot

Red Knot – Calidris canutus
Length:  10.5″; Wingspan: 23″; Weight: 4.7 oz.

Red Knots - Ed Konrad
Red Knots – Ed Konrad

Red Knots are the largest of the “peeps” in North America, roughly the same size as an American Robin.   It makes one of the longest yearly migrations of any bird, traveling 9,300 miles from its Arctic breeding grounds to Tierra del Fuego in southern South America.  Here on Seabrook Island, we are fortunate to see this bird on our beaches during the spring migration.

In winter, Red Knots are a pale gray with whitish flanks with dark barring and relatively short, dull yellow legs.  Their bill is relatively short and straight, tapering to a tip.  In the spring, individuals in the flock begin to attain their breeding plumage in which the head, neck and lower parts of the body become a pale salmon color.

Red Knots are a common yet exciting migrant through our area between  March and May.  Look for Red Knots feeding on invertebrates, especially bivalves, small snails, and crustaceans, at the edge of the surf and on mud flats in the inlet and river.  They are often found in large flocks during migration (hundreds of birds).  They feed actively, then move on to the next area as a group.  They may often be seen flying offshore in large groups >30 or so, fairly low to the water.  Knot flocks are tightly integrated and individuals wheel and turn with remarkable synchrony.

The Red Knot is a global species and they are in decline.  The populations wintering in South America dropped over 50% from the mid-1980s to 2003, and are listed as a federally threatened species in the U.S.  A 2012 study estimated the total number of all three North American subspecies at about 139,000 breeding birds.  The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN Red List) lists Red Knot as a Near Threatened species. The occurrence of large concentrations of knots at traditional staging areas during migration makes them vulnerable to pollution and loss of key resources.  For example, Delaware Bay is an important staging area during spring migration, where the knots feed on the eggs of spawning horseshoe crabs. It is estimated that nearly 90 percent of the entire population of the Red Knot can be present on the bay in a single day. The reduction in food available to the knots because of the heavy harvesting of horseshoe crabs may be responsible for a decline in Red Knot populations.

A group of Red Knots has many collective nouns, including a “cluster”, “fling” and “tangle” of knots.

Make a trip to North Beach and walk towards the spit.  The Red Knots arrived on Seabrook Island a few weeks ago and we may see them as late as early May before they finish their journey to high Arctic islands, northern Greenland, and the west coast of Alaska to breed. (See the range map following the photographs below.)

If you would like to learn more about this bird visit:

This blog post is part of a series SIB will publish on a regular basis to feature birds seen in the area, both migratory and permanent residents.  When possible we will use photographs taken by our members.    Please let us know if you have any special requests of birds you would like to learn more about.

Bird Sightings on Seabrook Island – Week Ending March 23, 2016

SIB will publish this regular blog post to report interesting or unusual bird sightings on Seabrook Island.  In the past week, we received these pictures and comments from one of our members and we’d like to share it with you.  As you will notice, spring has arrived!
 
Name: Glen Cox
Date & Time of Sighting: 3/23/2016
Name of Bird Species: Osprey
Number of Birds Sighted: 2
Location of Sighting: “I captured these photos in my backyard earlier this evening. My home is on the 6th fairway of Crooked Oak.  The nest is located in a large pine tree on the right side at about the 150′ marker.”
Please enjoy these photos taken by Glen Cox!
(click on a photo to view as a slide show)

SIB “Bird of the Week” – Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler – Setophaga coronata
Length:  5.5″; Wingspan: 9.25″; Weight: 0.43 oz.

Yellow-rumped Warbler - Ed Konrad
Yellow-rumped Warbler – Ed Konrad

Yellow-rumped Warblers are one of the most common warblers in North America and abundant on Seabrook Island from fall through spring.  The Yellow-rumped Warbler is sometimes referred to as “Butter Butt” due to its bright yellow rump.  It was formally called Myrtle Warbler in the East because it is the only Warbler able to digest the wax-coated berries of the Wax Myrtles.  On Seabrook, Butter Butts are our most obvious and widely distributed winter Warbler.  They arrive in November and depart in April.  You will see them in small flocks in open woodlands and brushy habitats.  This bird constantly “chirps” which is a contact call that keeps the flock together.

The Yellow-rumped is medium-sized warbler with a long narrow tail and stout dark bill.  In winter, the females, males and young are a paler streaked gray-brown, have bright yellow rumps and usually yellow side patches.  In the spring before they leave Seabrook Island, the male is dark blue-gray upper parts; white throat, breast and belly are white and heavily streaked with black.  Its rump, crown and small area at the sides of the breast are yellow.  There are two broad white wing bars. The female is brownish with the similar patterns.

In winter, Yellow-rumped warblers can be found in open pine and pine-oak forests and dunes where bayberries are common.  During this time they mainly eat berries and fruits, particularly wax-coated berries of bayberries and wax myrtles.  This bird has unique gastrointestinal traits that allow it to subsist on this unusual food source.  This makes them a very winter hardy bird allowing them to winter farther north than other warblers.

In the spring/summer these warblers are found in mature coniferous and mixed coniferous-deciduous woodlands feeding on insects including caterpillars, ants, leaf beetles, grasshoppers and spiders.  You might see them acting like Flycatchers as they leap off perches flying up to catch a passing insect.  They also eat wild seeds from beach grasses and goldenrod and may come to feeders to eat sunflower seeds, raisins, peanut butter and suet.

Yellow-rumped warblers are active and noisy birds.  They constantly chatter as they forage.  Their flight is agile and swift and the birds often call as they change direction.  Their yellow rump and white tail patches are very noticeable while flying.  Their song is a loose trill, but rising in pitch or dropping toward end and the call note is a loud “chek.”

A group of warblers has many collective nouns, including a “bouquet”, “confusion”, “fall”, and “wrench” of warblers.

If you would like to learn more about this bird visit The Cornell Lab of Ornithology – All About Birders: Yellow-rumped Warbler and Birds of Seabrook Island: Yellow-rumped Warbler

This blog post is part of a series SIB will publish on a regular basis to feature birds seen in the area, both migratory and permanent residents.  When possible we will use photographs taken by our members.    Please let us know if you have any special requests of birds you would like to learn more about.

(click on a photo to view as a slide show)

Bird Sightings on Seabrook Island – Week Ending March 13, 2016

This blog post is the first in a new series SIB will publish on a regular basis to report unusual bird sightings on Seabrook Island.  In the past week, we received two unusual sightings from a SIB member and a report of a number of shorebirds seen by five SIB members on North Beach.
 

Name: Melanie Jerome
Date & Time of Sighting: 3/12/2016 -8am
Name of Bird Species: Clapper Rail
Number of Birds Sighted: 1
Location of Sighting: Horseshoe creek on the way to new cut, while kayaking

Name: Melanie Jerome
Date & Time of Sighting: 3/6&7/2016
Name of Bird Species: Mockingbird with silver USGS tag (Watch for more info on finding and reporting birds with tags in an upcoming article)
Number of Birds Sighted: 1
Location of Sighting: Near Melanie’s villa at Creek Watch

Additional Sightings (see pictures below)

Five members of SIB (Marcia Hider, Aija & Ed Konrad, Flo Foley & Nancy Brown) took an informal walk on North Beach on Sunday March 13 between 9am – noon.  In total they saw 28 species.  The following were of particular interest:

2 American Oyster Catchers
2 Wilson’s Plovers
40 Semipalmated Plovers
8 Black-bellied Plovers
9 Piping Plovers
900 Red Knots
75 Sanderlings
150 Dunlins
2 Greater Yellowlegs
2 Least Sandpipers
2 Western Sandpipers
2 Short-billed Dowitchers
20 Black Skimmers
80 Tree Swallows

Please enjoy these photos taken by Ed Konrad!
(click on a photo to view as a slide show)

SIB “Bird of the Week” – American Goldfinch

This blog post is the first in a new series SIB will publish on a regular basis to feature birds seen in the area, both migratory and permanent residents.  When possible we will use photographs taken by our members.    Please let us know if you have any special requests of birds you would like to learn more about.

American GoldfinchSpinus tristis
Length:  5″; Wingspan: 9″; Weight: 0.46 oz.

American Goldfinch - Charles J Moore
American Goldfinch – Charles J Moore

This small finch is commonly found in flocks on Seabrook Island during the winter months (November – March) on backyard feeders, along the golf courses or anywhere there are weed seeds.  It has a sharply pointed bill, a small head, long wings and a short, notched tail.

Those of you who are familiar with this bird during breeding season (when the male has a bright yellow body and black cap, wings and tail), may not recognize them in their winter plumage.  The winter male has olive-gray to olive-brown upper parts, paler underparts, yellow shoulder bar, white wing bar, dark conical bill and may show black on its forehead and yellow on its throat and face.  The winter female is duller with buff wing and shoulder bars and lacks yellow and black on the face and head.  This drastic change in plumage is a result of the American Goldfinch, the only member of its family, having two complete molts each year, one in the fall and one in the spring.

American Goldfinches are among the strictest vegetarians in the bird world only inadvertently swallowing an occasional insect.  It feeds primarily on seeds, including seeds from composite plants (sunflowers, thistle, asters, etc), grasses and trees.  At feeders they favor nyjer and sunflower seeds (hulled).  In both situations it prefers to hang onto seed heads or feeders rather than feeding on the ground.

American Goldfinches are often described as active and acrobatic.  They are also easily identified by their undulating flight pattern of several rapid wing beats and then a pause.  Listen for their flight song while they are flapping, which sounds like po-ta-to-chip.

A group of goldfinches has many collective nouns, including a “007”, “charm”, “rush”, “treasury” and “vein” of goldfinches.

Keep an eye out for the American Goldfinch, as they will be leaving soon to head north to breed and will return when the weather up north gets cold again next fall. (See the range map following the photographs below.)

If you would like to learn more about this bird visit The Cornell Lab of Ornithology – All About Birders: American Goldfinch and Birds of Seabrook Island: American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch in winter - Bob Hider
American Goldfinch in winter – Bob Hider
American Goldfinch spring molt - Bob Hider
American Goldfinch spring molt – Bob Hider
American Goldfinch spring molt- Bob Hider
American Goldfinch spring molt- Bob Hider
Range Map of American Goldfinch - Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Range Map of American Goldfinch – Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Register for “Learning Together – Birding on the Beach”

On Thursday, March 24, 2016, SIB is sponsoring our second member activity by hosting a “Learning Together – Birding on the Beach,” a casual walk on North Beach of two miles (or more) for approximately 1 1/2 hours to view birds common to the beaches on Seabrook Island.  The walk will leave the parking lot of North Beach Boardwalk #1 promptly at 8:30 am.  Please bring water, sunscreen, bug repellent, hat and if you have them binoculars and/or a camera.  Limit 20 people.

If you are not yet a SIB member, you must first become a member by following the instructions here.

Once you are a member, please click here to register no later than Tuesday March 22, 2016.  All registrants will receive a confirmation letter on Wednesday March 23, 2016.

Thanks!

Website: SeabrookIslandBirders.org
E-Mail:  SeabrookIslandBirders@gmail.com

Shore birds of Seabrook Island - Charles J Moore
Shore birds of Seabrook Island – Charles J Moore